The European Public Prosecutor's Office becomes the Centre’s 69th client

We are pleased to announce that on 11 November 2020 the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO) and the Translation Centre signed an agreement whereby the Centre becomes the language service provider for the EPPO. This agreement sees the Centre’s portfolio increasing to 69 clients.

Given the confidential nature of the documents to be handled by the EPPO, the Centre and the Office have agreed on a specific on-premise machine translation solution, namely Custom Machine Translation as a Service, which will be available 24/7 to the client. Building on the work undertaken by the European Commission, and the Centre’s own activities in the area of machine translation technology, this service is based on dedicated, secure and customised automatic translation software.

In practical terms, the Centre’s service package for the EPPO will include the provision of all necessary resources, including management of the solution, and the periodic linguistic maintenance, quality control and assessment of the translation engines.

The signing of this agreement illustrates again that the Centre can offer to its clients, not only traditional services, but also tailor-made services, by combining attentive listening to clients' needs, flexibility to adapt working methods, use of technological advances, and inspiration from its long-standing experience. The Centre looks forward to helping the EPPO effectively carry out its important mission for the benefit of EU citizens.

 

The EPPO: The EU’s answer to fighting crimes against the EU budget

In October 2017, the Council adopted Regulation (EU) 2017/1939, creating the European Public Prosecutor's Office (EPPO). Since then, the EPPO has been establishing its operational structure at all levels and the Office will be operational in early 2021.

The mission of this new and independent EU body is to fight large-scale crime, with powers to investigate and prosecute crimes committed against the EU budget through fraud or corruption. In this way, the EU provides itself with a supranational and cross-border mechanism to protect its financial interests and avoid significant economic damage.

The EPPO is located in Luxembourg and, to date, the participating countries are 22 out of the 27 EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.

In September 2019, the European Parliament and the Council appointed Ms Laura Codruta Kövesi as the first European Chief Prosecutor. In July 2020, the Council appointed the 22 prosecutors representing the Member State participants.

 

More information on the EPPO is available here and in this video:

Image: EPPO video, European Commission